Resources

Program Design and Delivery Tips:

  1. Begin with the end in mind, and at the initial planning stages consider where do you want to see the student at the end of the school year and/or in three to five years.
  2. What supports, infrastructure improvements changes can be made to facilitate inclusion of the student in the general education classroom setting?
  3. Ensure adoption and application of Universal Design for Learning principles during the program planning phase to facilitate access, engagement and active participation of learners with diverse needs.

Instructional Tips:

  • Ensure information is presented in various formats during instructional delivery to gain and sustain attention and promote active involvement:
    • Text passages or stories supported with concrete objects, pictures/photos, & auditory input.
    • Adapt stories and text passages by simplifying them or providing short summaries.
    • Use visual aids, graphic organizers, story boards, manipulatives, etc.
    • Provide hands-on activities and real-life situations in Math and Science.
    • Address different learning styles through multi-sensory instruction, involving auditory, visual, kinesthetic and tactile senses.
    • Adapt skill expectations (e.g., Adjust complexity level to meet individual learner needs).
    • Integrate mainstream and assistive technology into the lesson during instruction.
    • Teach specific alternative behavior to replace the student’s problem behaviors.
    • Monitor how you react and respond to challenging behaviors.
    • Use planned cues and prompts consistently to redirect inappropriate behaviors.
  • Use interactive instructional techniques to motivate learners, reduce attentional and behavioral issues and increase student learning.
    • Interactive small group activities
    • Simulated real-life situations
    • Hands-on functional activities
    • Animated story-reading
    • Role Play and Drama
    • Interviewing Techniques
    • Use of concrete and multi-sensory instructional materials
    • Literacy/Math Games
    • Simulated Classroom Store

Behavior Tips

  • Teach specific alternative behavior to replace the student’s problem behaviors. Monitor how you react and respond to challenging behaviors. Use planned cues and prompts consistently to redirect inappropriate behaviors.
  • Use Praise Effectively to Stroke Your Student Positively!
    • Praise is under-used despite its powerful impact. Research strongly demonstrates praise increases the social and behavioral competence of children. Praise can be used to build a positive relationship with your student/child. Provide immediate and positive feedback
    • Use praise that is non-judgmental; specific and descriptive. A few sample statements to stroke your student positively:
      • “I like the way you are listening to the story.”
      • “WOW!! What a fabulous job you’ve done of… (“of writing this essay”; or “writing your name”; “working on your math problem”)
    • Maintain a ratio of 4-5 positive statements to 1 corrective statement.